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A Taco de Barbacoa, One of Mexico's Culinary Delicacies
A Taco de Barbacoa, One of Mexico's Culinary Delicacies

Three Mexican Barbacoa Temples in Mexico City

Three Mexican Barbacoa Temples in Mexico City

Delicacies from Mexico’s Capital City Taken to Their Maximum Expression

 

The Mexican “Barbacoa,” the so-called “Barbacha” (which, by the way, you cannot translate Barbacoa to the English language as “Barbecue” since Mexican Barbacoa isn’t a grilled dish at all).

This delicious dish is a culinary specialty that the Maya and Aztec nations inherited to the contemporary Mexicans and the world.

It involves a typical cooking style inside a hole dug in the ear. Burning wood, coals, and stones cook sheep and goat meat portions placed over them.

A Taco de Barbacoa, One of Mexico's Culinary Delicacies
A Taco de Barbacoa, One of Mexico’s Culinary Delicacies

Depending on Mexico’s region, this cooking technique may see cooking beef, chicken, pork, or even rabbit meat like in the “Estado de México” (State of Mexico).

The Barbacoa is usually cooked by wrapping it in “Maguey” sticks.

Because Mexico is such a vast nation in terms of social, cultural, and culinary expressions, the way to prepare this typical dish varies from region to region, as I previously mentioned above.

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The Barbacoa represents one of the hundreds of Mexican current culinary culture contemporary innumerable nuances.

This delicious dish, typical of weekends, has great consumer acceptance appeal in the states of Hidalgo, Mexico City, Tlaxcala, Querétaro, Estado de México, and Morelos.

You can also find extended consumption in states like Guerrero, Chihuahua, Chiapas, Coahuila, Oaxaca, and Guanajuato.

Since the 15th century, when, as a result of the Spanish conquest, sheep, pigs, and cattle arrived in Mexico, this fantastic and delicious dish appears in Mexican cuisine.

Ancient documents from that century started to mention the Barbacoa’s preparation core ingredients and some key indications on how to cook this typical Mexican dish as well.

You Can Accompany The Barbacoa With The Salsa Borracha or The Salsa Roja; Mexico
You Can Accompany The Barbacoa With The Salsa Borracha or The Salsa Roja; Mexico

The Barbacoa requires slow and patient low heat cooking.

However, a typical majestic dish also requires some majestic places to eat this marvelous dish that I can undoubtedly call the “Barbacoa Temples.”

The typical weekend dish par excellence at these restaurants reaches superfluous flavors notes that will make your mouth water.

This way, Franco Magno took it upon himself the “burdensome” and “unpleasant” task to investigate three of the best Aztec temples in Mexico City (CDMX) for the “Mexican Barbacha.”

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La Oveja Negra (The Black Sheep)

 

I’m sure that you guessed it out. The specialty here is the Barbacoa, of course. You can guzzle the Barbacha by kilogram portions or in individual tacos.

At this restaurant, the owners proclaim that the Barbacoa’s preparation modality and recipe served here has its origin in the beautiful Tulancingo city, Hidalgo state.

Let me tell you that, thanks to the historical documents I mentioned above, Hidalgo’s state appears to be the original Barbacoa cradle.

With several locations throughout Mexico City, such as the one located in the iconic “Santa Maria la Ribera” neighborhood, experiencing a culinary journey into the “Oveja Negra” is a guaranteed delight.

The Barbacoa Is Uusually Cooked by Wrapping It in Maguey Sticks; Mexico
The Barbacoa Is Uusually Cooked by Wrapping It in Maguey Sticks; Mexico

Don’t forget to accompany your tacos with the “Salsa Borracha,” the typical and unavoidable dressing for the Barbacoa tacos. By the way, this salsa has a low spicy sensation in your mouth when it’s prepared correctly.

Please, my Magno followers, don’t panic. No need to call a doctor or firefighters.

I mention this because of my Magno fans who live abroad and barely hear mentioning the word “Chile” start running to the kitchen for a pitcher with water.

Ah! just forgetting it, the “Salsa Borracha” (Drunken sauce, literally) doesn’t contain alcohol, and it does accompany the Barbacoa perfectly.

And what about the “Consomé de Carnero”? (Ram consommé). The third undisputable companion for the tacos and the Salsa Borracha. Please be sure to eat it (or drink it, if you prefer it) very hot.

 

El Hidalguense

 

Once again, we have another worthy and excellent representative of Hidalgo’s state, indeed beautiful in natural settings and gastronomic delights.

Hidalgo’s state soul and spirit have been poured into the softness, texture, smell, and flavor that permeate Barbacoa at this restaurant.

You can accompany some Barbacoa tacos with the typical “Consomé de Carnero” (Ram consommé).

Don’t forget the top your taco with the “Salsa Borracha.” You’ll experience a culinary paradise in your tongues and palates. The “Hidalguense” is a temple you can find in the city’s neighborhood called “Roma Sur.”

 

Barbacoa de Santiago

 

Finally, I can’t fail to mention in this tasty post about the capital’s Barbacoa temples, this excellent Mexican Barbacoa culinary representative. This restaurant has its location in the “Nápoles” neighborhood, mid-southern Mexico City.

Delicious Barbacoa, soft tortillas, exquisite Salsa Borracha, everything here is delicious.

The Barbacoa de Santiago is a busy place on weekends since the art of tasting and eating this marvelous Mexican dish finds here another sense, that other sense that paints a smile on your face.

It’s also worth mentioning the tastiness of its Consomé de Carnero.

Do you like to eat at a restaurant with typical Mexican decoration? You’re covered.

This Barbacoa temple features colonial decoration indoors, which complements a mouth-watering journey into this Mexican Barbacoa cathedral heart.

Now, what is the result of combining fantastic accommodation options at very affordable prices and awesome tours? Hostelworld and Musement.

These partners of mine offer you excellent lodging rates here and amazing tour options here, so that you can enjoy Mexico City to the fullest. Thank you very much for supporting me.

You Can Ask For a Taco de Barbacoa in Their Modalities of Maciza or Pancita; Mexico
You Can Ask For a Taco de Barbacoa in Their Modalities of Maciza or Pancita; Mexico

Finally, I can’t finish this post without making a little recommendation.

Since Barbacoa is a typical weekend dish, I recommend arriving at these Barbacoa sanctuaries one or two hours before the usual lunchtime, which is usually around two, three, or even four in the afternoon on weekends in Mexico City.

This way, you’ll get an excellent table to eat a hot, juicy, and tasty Barbacoa.

It’s entirely up to you, my Magno readers if you wish to accompany your Barbacha with a bottle of cold beer. I type down this because, let me be sincere, I know many of you friends.

I’ve seen thousands of you, foreign travelers in Mexico, drinking lots of beer in Cancun, Puerto Vallarta, Los Cabos, etc. A soda or a typical Mexican fruit-flavored freshwater will do a perfect match too.

And before you start chewing, I wish you delicious, and incredible Barbacoa flavored moments that will hardly leave your memory on your visit to Mexico City.

Are you ready for some great experiences in Mexico City? My partner Hotels.com have great hotel offers just for Magno followers:

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